Unreasonable’s CEO Teju Ravilochan Named Forbes 30 Under 30: Social Entrepreneurs

Unreasonable Institute’s CEO and Co-Founder was named one of Forbes 30 Under 30: Social Entrepreneurs last week. Unreasonable is our partner on our Business Model Generation and Pitching labs. Congratulations, Teju Ravilochan! Here’s his featured honoree video you can watch on Forbes to learn more about Unreasonable and Teju! Also watch Teju’s TEDx talk:

 

Meet our Partners: Medora Ventures

We recently finished prototyping for our Business Model Generation Part 2: Financial Forecasts lab so wanted to introduce you to our partner. Medora Ventures is a strategy consulting firm for purpose driven ventures. It was founded on the belief that the most valuable investments produce a return not only for shareholders but also for the local community, for society overall, and ultimately for generations to come. They apply proven approaches to develop impact strategies that minimize resource use, mitigate risks, and ensure lasting gains. They help clients measure and message their impact in the world, which sets them apart from competitors and builds customer loyalty. They also help unlock opportunities for growth by creating outreach strategies and developing connections into new markets and sectors. Continue reading to learn more about the lab.

Once the Business Model Canvas tool has been has been created, this lab teaches participants to create a financial model and financial forecast. they will learn the basics of building a simple financial model and forecast while studying archetype case studies of common financial models relevant to CARE’s work including rural sales and distribution, trading platforms, social enterprises, and consulting. Previously, when CARE has sought to spin off a social enterprise or create a consulting practice, we hired consultants to create financial forecasts. The problem is, those models end up being too complex and staff do not have the skills to actively use the tools. Furthermore, the complex models are not appropriate for early stage ventures that are still evolving their business models. Instead, staff shepherding the ventures need the skills to use the forecasting tools and actively adapt the model as the model evolves.

 

Krishi Utsho Featured in IFC’s Investing in Women along Agribusiness Value Chains Report

The International Finance Corporation (IFC) recently released this report about Investing in Women along Agribusiness Value Chains that features a case study on Bangladesh’s Krishi Utsho. We especially love the infographic on KU’s microfranchise model on page 19.

 

[Credit: IFC www.ifc.org]

3 Lessons To Guide Designing Better Financial Tech for the Developing World from GRID Impact

Check out this article 3 Lessons To Guide Designing Better Financial Tech For The Developing World” on Fast Company Exist from Alexandra Fiorillo’s op-ed on GRID Impact’s financial inclusion work in Pakistan. Alex is founder and principal at GRID Impact, our partner in the Human-Centered Design lab. Here’s a sneak peek:

  1. Promote individual use, but don’t be too prescriptive
  2. Design for skills education
  3. Design for local relevance

Read more here!

 

5 Questions Answered about CARE’s Health Social Enterprise Live Well

Live Well, CARE’s health social enterprise in Zambia, was born out of the USAID funded PRISM project in partnership with Population Services International, better known as PSI. You may have read about Live Well’s CEO Charles Kalonga since he’s currently participating in an external accelerator which Scale X Design previously announced. Recently Charles connected with PSI to provide content for their current issue of Impact magazine which focuses on making markets work as a critical component to sustainable development. As a part of the issue, they wrote this piece on 4 Social Enterprises You Should Know About which included Live Well. Here are the answers Charles provided about Live Well.

(1)   Who is the market failing? Rural and under-served communities are impacted by the limited availability of health products and services.

(2)   How is the market failing? Only half of all rural families live within 5 kilometers of a health facility.[1]  The average rural family is 8 kilometers away, though distances can reach up to 50 kilometers.[2] An inconsistent supply chain means that health facilities often do not have products available for communities.    Thus, while free health care and free health products are technically available at any Government of Zambia facility, there are significant barriers for the population to receive these goods & services.

(3)   Where do you work in the market? Live Well seeks to establish sustainable operations that will reliably provide rural and peri-urban Zambians with access to quality health products and will supplement livelihoods in a country where roughly 75% of the population earns less than USD $1.25 a day, almost 8% of children die before age 5, and only 11% of children aged 6 – 23 months are fed appropriately.[3]

(4)   How do you plan to implement your vision for success/growth/scale? Through the creation of a sustainable supply chain, Live Well will reach under-served communities in Zambia with necessary health products. A team of Community Health Entrepreneurs will sell these products door to door, generating supplemental income for themselves while promoting health in their communities. As the enterprise grows, it will realize economies of scale and greater efficiencies in operations to turn a profit and become sustainable.

(5)   Why should we highlight Live Well at this juncture in time as a leading emerging social enterprise? What key milestones of success has Live Well achieved? Live Well is still a nascent enterprise in Zambia (soft-launch in Nov 2015), but in a very short time it has trained over 300 Community Health Entrepreneurs and is operating in over 10 rural and peri-urban communities. It offers target consumers a broad basket of over 25 products which includes over the counter medications, nutritional products, contraceptives, hygiene products, solar lamps and cook stoves will be added this year. Live Well has benefitted from a unique partnership between Barclays Bank and GSK in Zambia. The partnership has not only resulted in the initial funding to start the social enterprise but both companies have provided business support to guide and build the capacity of Live Well.

 

 

[1] African Development Bank, African Development Fund, Republic of Zambia: Multi-sector Country Gender Profile (2006).

[2] Id.

[3] World Bank, Zambia Poverty Assessment: Stagnant Poverty and Inequality in a Natural Resource-Based Economy (2012); Central Statistical Office, Republic of Zambia, Zambia Demographic and Health Survey, 2013 – 2014 (2015), available at https://dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/FR304/FR304.pdf.

Meet the Teams: Broadening Gender

Sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) continues to be a significant issue facing women and girls in Sri Lanka. A large number of studies conducted on SGBV tend to evaluate the impact it has on victims/survivors. Having reviewed existing research conducted on SGBV in Sri Lanka, CARE Sri Lanka identified a gap in research: there was no study that examined the attitudes of male perpetrators of SGBV. Our groundbreaking study Broadening Gender: Why Masculinities Matter, conducted over three years in collaboration with Partners for Prevention, was born out of a need to fill this gap.

Twenty-four percent of the men surveyed admitted to using physical violence against their wives or partners, while 15% of men surveyed admitted to having committed rape, with the majority of cases involving the rape of a partner. The study also highlighted some disturbing findings, particularly in relation to men’s motivation for perpetrating violence, as well as in relation to the culture of impunity that leads to a cycle of violence. For example, 67% of men who reported perpetration of sexual violence said that they were motivated by sexual entitlement—their “right” to have sexual relations with women.

CARE Sri Lanka is instituting a multi-pronged approach to tackle SGBV that works with men and boys to address the attitudes of male perpetrators of SGBV. This approach includes implementing a key policy recommendation to address GBV within all state universities in Sri Lanka and working with the Ministry of Women’s Affairs to pilot five Child and Women Development Units (CWDU) in five divisions in Sri Lanka. These units support state offices to prevent and respond to SGBV effectively.

Team members Vindhya Fernando and Ashika Gunasena will be representing their work with Broadening Gender at the upcoming Scale X Design Challenge!

Additional contributors to this effort includes:

Zainab Ilrahim, Program Advisor

Hashitha Abeywardana, Program Advisor

Jayanthi Kuru-Utumpala, Gender & Sexuality Specialist